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Can CBD get you high? is it safe?

 

No worries, these aren't obvious questions. We’re here for you! and when it comes to CBD... there’s a lot to understand starting with the basics. CBD is short for Cannabidiol and it’s a natural compound already present in our bodies, also conveniently produced by hemp plants.

It can not, ever, get you high because it’s pretty different from THC, another compound found in hemp plants that is actually separated in the process of CBD extraction. While full spectrum CBD products may contain a % of THC, it’s never enough to give you the feels, aka: psychoactive effects like sedation or euphoria.

THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the one responsible for these sensations and most CBD products only contain from 0.0% to 0.3% of it. The World Health Organization defines “psychoactive substances” as any substance that affects mental processes like cognition. While THC-rich cannabis is clearly psychoactive, CBD does not slow or speed up mental processing and it’s only related to subtle relaxation (not sedation) as it’s a powerful anti-inflammatory that also offers pain relief and lowers blood pressure. This is why it can be seen, in other words, as the one compound that has all the health benefits of hemp, without any of the psychoactive effects of THC.

 

 

Another -major- differentiator is the fact that CBD is non-intoxicating. This basically means that you can’t have “too much” of it if you double today’s dose and it has no side effects. Dosage recommendations are usually more related to better use than precautions: it’s convenient to start with the smallest dose as it might just be enough for you, but you can safely pop a CBD gummy with your breakfast before giving a speech or playing an important game, if anything, you’ll feel less anxious and more ready for it. True Story.

A study published in the US National Library of Medicine showed Cannabidiol reduces the anxiety induced by simulated public speaking in Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) patients. In it, the speakers presented significant decreases in subjective anxiety and modulated the same brain areas as the healthy volunteers. Great speeches, no high.

 




Sources:

World Health Organization. https://www.who.int/substance_abuse/terminology/ psychoactive_substances/en/

US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ articles/PMC3079847/ 

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